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Could an apple a day keep heart disease away?

Posted: 3 December 2020 | | No comments yet

According to British Apples and Pears, the amount of fibre apples contain means they fill you up for longer, while new research suggests they might also help reduce blood pressure.

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Coronary heart disease (CHD) is one of the biggest cause of deaths worldwide and the leading cause of premature deaths in the UK for both men and women.1 With the UK still living under COVID-19 restrictions countrywide, leading dietitian Sian Porter has teamed up with British Apples and Pears (BAP), a company dedicated to promoting the two fruits, to encourage consumers to make healthier snacking choices at home. The hope is this will help lower the risk of heart disease and high blood pressure.

“Fifty-seven percent of consumers say the pandemic has changed their food habits. Health, especially personal health, is now more of a driver than ever before,” said Porter. She explained that this is making people “think differently” about how they cook, eat and shop and pointed to an upward trend of “more mindful” snacking.

She continued: “We know from research that eating fruit, and specific fruits such as apples and pears, is associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular Disease (CVD) including strokes and CHD, so snacking on fruit such as apples makes sense when you want to eat more healthily and look after your cardiovascular health.”

Recent research claims that increasing flavanol intake – bioactive compounds found in good amounts in foods like apples – is associated with a statistically significant lowering of blood pressure in men and women with the highest intakes, versus those with lowest intakes.2

“A daily apple is such a simple way to support our cardiovascular health and make a healthier snacking choice,” said BAP Executive Chair, Ali Capper. “Swapping that sugary snack for a crisp, juicy British apple is not only a treat for our bodies, it’s a treat for our taste buds too.”

Being overweight is another risk factor for CVD. As a source of fibre, including pectin, BAP says apples have the potential to create a full feeling. Moreover, with the average apple just 77kcal, they can replace higher calorie foods to help people manage their weight as part of a healthy diet and lifestyle. According to BAP, adjusting diets to incorporate more fruit and vegetables is a crucial addition when it comes to looking after our health, including lowering the risk of Cardiovascular disease (CVD).

References

  1. www.who.int/health-topics/cardiovascular-diseases/#:~:text=Cardiovascular%20diseases%20(CVDs)%20are%20the,heart%20disease%20and%20other%20conditions.
  2.  www.nature.com/articles/s41598-020-74863-7

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