article

Food Safety supplement 2013

Posted: 22 February 2013 | Dr Hilde Kruse, Helen Bahia, Knuth Lorenzen | No comments yet

Antibiotic resistance: a major concern for food safety (Dr Hilde Kruse, Programme Manager Food Safety, WHO Regional Office for Europe)
Meat contamination in Europe (Helen Bahia, Editor, New Food)
CIP tank farm arrangements (Knuth Lorenzen, EHEDG President)

Food Safety Supplement 2013This free to view Food Safety supplement is sponsored by TwistDx, ToxiMet, Bio-Rad, Randox Food Diagnostics, Neogen, Scanjet Systems and Albany ASSA ABLOY:

  • Antibiotic resistance: a major concern for food safety
    Dr Hilde Kruse, Programme Manager Food Safety, WHO Regional Office for Europe
    Antibiotics have revolutionised the treatment of infectious diseases. Unfortunately, their use and misuse have also resulted in the development and spread of antibiotic resistance, which causes treatment failures and consequently more severe and longer-lasting diseases, increased hospitalisation rates, more deaths and higher costs to society. Antibiotic resistance has now become a growing public health problem that requires urgent attention…
  • Meat contamination in Europe
    Helen Bahia, Editor, New Food
    On 15 January 2013, the Food Standards Agency (FSA) reported that an analysis carried out by the agency into the authenticity of a number of burger products revealed that some products contained horse and pig DNA. Of the 27 products tested, 10 tested positive for horse DNA and 23 tested positive for pig DNA. Horse DNA was found in low levels in nine of the 10 products, while the last product, frozen burgers from British retailer Tesco, contained approximately 29 per cent horse meat…
  • CIP tank farm arrangements
    Knuth Lorenzen, EHEDG President
    A cleaning-in-place (CIP) system can be only as effective as its design, construction, installation and operation. There are a number of opportunities to minimise or eliminate the limitation in today’s CIP systems. One is the engineering of the CIP tank farm and the selection of the equipment in relation to the choice of CIP system on which this article is based. Indeed, there are a lot of other factors to minimise or eliminate the limitation in today’s CIP systems. The most important factor is training and education in hygienic design to all people which are giving input to engineering, executing, operating and maintaining CIP- and food process plants. If all those people are familiar with the relevant food safety legislation, with GMP, HACCP and the hygienic design criteria and its principles. (EHEDG Doc. 8, 9, 10, 13, 14, 16, 17, 18, 20 and 25) and be trained and educated further on human errors can be minimised…


Send this to a friend