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Tesco to ban brands that use excessive packaging

Tesco has briefed suppliers that the size and suitability of packaging will be assessed as part of category reviews and ranging decisions.

In a bid to reduce plastic waste, Tesco has pledged to ban any brands that use excessive packaging from its stores.

The supermarket has announced the launch of the second phase of its ‘Remove, Reduce, Reuse & Recycle’ plan which aims to remove hard-to-recycle materials from products. The scheme will see Tesco remove 4,000 tonnes of hardest to recycle materials from its brand products by the end of the year and now it wants to work with brands to do the same. 

The second phase has set out four steps that will govern packaging design across all product categories:

Tesco has said it is placing a greater focus on packaging in commercial negotiations.

  • Remove all non-recyclable and hard to recycle material
  • Where Tesco can’t remove, reduce it to an absolute minimum, including excess packaging
  • Explore new opportunities to reuse it, and if we can’t
  • Ensure it is all recycled as part of a closed loop.

With this new announcement, Tesco has also briefed suppliers that from next year, the size and suitability of packaging will be assessed as part of category reviews and ranging decisions.

“From next year, we will assess packaging as part of our ranging decisions, and if it’s excessive or inappropriate, we reserve the right not to list it,” said Dave Lewis, CEO, Tesco Group.

Through the lens of ‘Remove, Reduce, Reuse & Recycle’ we can transform our approach to packaging.”

When asked for a comment, a spokesperson for Tesco said to New Food: “We’re not promising to ban suppliers but we are placing a greater focus on packaging in commercial negotiations.”

In its statement, Tesco also reiterated its call for the government to introduce a national collection and recycling infrastructure to deliver a closed loop for packaging: “Without a national infrastructure, industry efforts to improve the recyclability of materials used in packaging will be a drop in the ocean,” Lewis continued. “In January 2018, we called on the Government to introduce this infrastructure and offered to help, including giving space in our car parks for recycling and testing the collection of materials not currently recycled by local councils.

“That invitation stands and the need for action has never been more pressing.”

 

 

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