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Recall roundup: enoki and dried mushrooms, pet treats and cheese

Posted: 27 March 2020 | | No comments yet

Food and beverage products are recalled due to reasons ranging from contamination to incorrect labelling, and here is New Food’s roundup of the most recent cases.

Recall roundup: undeclared allergens

Guan’s Mushroom Co recalls Enoki Mushroom 

Guan’s Mushroom Co of Commerce, CA is recalling all cases of its 200g packages of Enoki Mushroom (Product of Korea) because it has the potential to be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes, an organism which can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems.

Although healthy individuals may suffer only short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhoea, Listeria infection can cause miscarriages and stillbirths among pregnant women.

The recalled products were distributed from CA, NY, PA in retail stores through produce distributors or wholesalers.

No illnesses have been reported to date in connection with this problem, however a separate recall of enoki mushrooms has recently been linked with a number of deaths and hospitalisations in the US.

The potential for contamination was noted after routine testing by State of California revealed the presence of Listeria monocytogenes in 200g package of Enoki.

Consumers who have purchased 200g packages of Enoki are urged to return them to the place of purchase for a full refund.

IcelandicPlus LLC recalls Whole Capelin Fish Pet Treats

Out of an abundance of caution, IcelandicPlus LLC of Ft. Washington, PA, is recalling its Capelin Pet Treats because some of the fish have exceeded the FDA compliance guideline for fish larger than five inches. The FDA has determined that salt-cured, dried, or fermented un-eviscerated fish larger than five inches have been linked to outbreaks of botulism poisoning in humans between 1981 and 1987 and again in 1991.

boutlism poisoining

Common symptoms of Clostridium botulinum may include dizziness, blurred or double vision, trouble with speaking or swallowing, difficulty breathing, muscle weakness, abdominal distension, and constipation.

Since some IcelandicPlus Capelins are larger than five inches there is a possible health risk. To date there have been no reported illnesses of dogs, cats, or persons in connection with Capelin. Nor has there been any positive test results for Clostridium botulinum from any IcelandicPlus Capelin, but because of the potential risk, and despite no known illnesses in connection with products, the company has announced this product recall.

Clostridium botulinum toxin can cause severe clinical signs including death in both animals consuming the pet treat and people handling the pet treat or coming in contact with contact areas that have been exposed to the product. 

The Capelin product was shipped to distributors in the US with the intent to be sold to retailers who in turn sell to consumers. This product would be found in Independent Pet Specialty Stores within all States in the US.

Distributors, retailers and consumers who have purchased IcelandicPlus’s Capelin can return it to the location where it was purchased for a refund.

Tiffany Food Corp recalls Huangfushanzen Dried Mushrooms

Tiffany Food Corp. of Brooklyn, NY is recalling Huangfushanzen Huang Mountain Tea Mushroom (黄府山珍茶花菇) Dried Mushrooms, because it may contain undeclared sulphites. People who have a severe sensitivity to sulphites run the risk of serious or life-threatening allergic reaction if they consume this product.

Huangfushanzen Huang Mountain Tea Mushroom (黄府山珍茶花菇) Dried Mushrooms was distributed in FL, OH, CA, MA and through grocery stores and food markets. No illnesses have been reported to date.

The recall was initiated after routine sampling by Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (FDACS) and subsequent analysis revealed the presence of sulphites in Huangfushanzen Huang Mountain Tea Mushroom (黄府山珍茶花菇) Dried Mushrooms which were not declared on the label at a level that could cause a life-threatening reaction in sulphite-sensitive individuals.

Retailers should remove this product from sale and place on hold until they receive further instructions from the recalling firm. Consumers who have purchased 170g/6oz packages of Huangfushanzen Huang Mountain Tea Mushroom (黄府山珍茶花) Dried Mushrooms are urged to return them to the place of purchase for a full refund.

Further information regarding the above recalls can be found on the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) website.

Fromagerie Blackburn brand Le Napoléon recalls Firm Cheese

Fromagerie Blackburn is recalling Fromagerie Blackburn brand Le Napoléon – Firm Cheese from the marketplace due to possible Listeria monocytogenes contamination. Consumers should not consume the recalled products described below.

Recall roundup

Listeria monocytogenes is an organism which can cause serious and sometimes fatal infections in young children, frail or elderly people, and others with weakened immune systems.

Consumers who are unsure if they have purchased the affected products are advised to contact their retailer.

Recalled products should be thrown out or returned to the store where they were purchased. Food contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes may not look or smell spoiled but can still cause illness. Pregnant women, the elderly and people with weakened immune systems are particularly at risk. Although infected pregnant women may experience only mild, flu-like symptoms, the infection can lead to premature delivery, infection of the newborn or even stillbirth.

This recall was triggered by the company. The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) is conducting a food safety investigation, which may lead to the recall of other products. If other high-risk products are recalled, the CFIA will notify the public through updated Food Recall Warnings.

There have been no reported illnesses associated with the consumption of these products.

Further information regarding this recall can be found on the CFIA website.

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