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Recall roundup: baby food, oregano, cheese and raw ground beef

Posted: 29 January 2020 | | No comments yet

Food and beverage products are recalled due to reasons ranging from contamination to incorrect labelling, and here is New Food’s roundup of the most recent cases.

Recall roundup: Major UK supermarkets recall popular products

Cow & Gate and Tesco recall 7+ months Cow & Gate baby food jars

Cow & Gate and Tesco are voluntarily recalling 15 varieties of 7+ month Cow & Gate baby food jars (200g) sold by Tesco stores in the UK, as a precautionary measure following concerns that some jars may have been tampered with. The recall only involves these varieties sold in Tesco stores in the UK. No other Cow & Gate, Tesco or other branded baby products are affected.

Point of sale notices will be displayed in all retail stores that are selling these products. These notices explain to customers why the products are being recalled and tell them what to do if they have bought the product. Please see the attached notice.

Customers you have purchased any of the products have been advised not to feed them anyone and instead return them to the Tesco store from where it was purchased for a full refund.

Further information can be found on the Food Standards Agency (FSA) website.

Lidl GB recalls Kania Oregano

Lidl GB is recalling Kania Oregano due to the possible presence of high levels of pyrrolizidine alkaloids. Pyrrolizidine alkaloids are naturally occurring; however, prolonged consumption of high levels can lead to liver disease.

Point of sale notices will be displayed in all retail stores that are selling this product. These notices explain to customers why the product is being recalled and tell them what to do if they have bought the product. Please see the attached notice.

Customers you have purchased any of the products have been advised not consume them and instead return them to the Lidl GB store from where it was purchased for a full refund.

Further information can be found on the Food Standards Agency (FSA) website.

Quesos La Ricura LTD. recalls Cotija Cheese (Queso Cotija)

Quesos La Ricura LTD. of Hicksville, New York, is recalling 12 oz. packages of Cotija Cheese (Queso Cotija) because it may be contaminated with Shiga toxin producing E. coli bacteria.

Shiga toxin producing E. coli causes a diarrheal illness often with bloody stools. Although most healthy adults can recover completely within a week, some people can develop a form of kidney failure called Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (HUS). HUS is most likely to occur in young children and the elderly. The condition can lead to serious kidney damage and even death. No illnesses have been reported to date.

Cotija Cheese (Queso Cotija) was distributed through retail stores in the following US states: NY, NC, PA, GA, FL

A voluntary recall has initiated after sampling at retail by the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services discovered that the product was contaminated with Shiga toxin producing E. coli.

Consumers who have purchased Quesos La Ricura Cotija Cheese (Queso Cotija) are urged to return it to the place of purchase for a full refund.

Further information can be found on the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) website.

Amity Packing Company Inc. recalls raw ground beef products

Amity Packing Company Inc., a Chicago, Illinois establishment, is recalling approximately 2,020 pounds of raw ground beef products that may be contaminated with extraneous materials, specifically clear, thin pliable plastic.

The raw ground beef items were produced on 6 Jan. 2020. The problem was discovered after Pre Brands LLC. received two consumer complaints reporting findings of clear, thin pliable plastic in raw ground beef. 

There have been no confirmed reports of adverse reactions due to consumption of these products. Anyone concerned about an injury or illness has been advised to contact a healthcare provider.   

FSIS is concerned that some product may be in consumers’ refrigerators or freezers. Consumers who have purchased these products are urged not to consume them.

Further information can be found on the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) website.

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