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VIDEO: Food Industry Intelligence Network ‘helps beat fraud’

Posted: 19 March 2018 | | No comments yet

The Food Industry Intelligence Network (FIIN) helps to beat food fraud by sharing information more effectively, says its co-chair Helen Sisson in this video interview filmed at New Food’s Food Fraud 2018 conference.

The Food Industry Intelligence Network (FIIN) helps to beat food fraud by sharing information more effectively, says its co-chair Helen Sisson in this video interview filmed at New Food’s Food Fraud 2018 conference.

“FINN really does address one of the central recommendations in Professor Chris Elliott’s reports [into the horsemeat crisis] – that industry needed to come together to share intelligence,” said Sisson, who is group technical director of convenience food manufacturer Greencore.

“What FINN has done is to create the ability for industry to feel comfortable about sharing all the work it is doing in testing and traceability to challenge the authenticity and integrity of the supply chain surrounding the manufacturing of food in the UK.”

Major manufacturers

The network was established in 2015 with 21 founding members, including major manufacturers, retailers and foodservice companies.

In addition to establishing a safe haven for food businesses to collect, collate, analyse and disseminate information and intelligence about the integrity of food supply chains, FIIN aims to share intelligence with government bodies to better understand the risk from fraud. It also seeks to help divert, detect, deter and disrupt fraudulent activity in the food supply chain.

Disrupt fraudulent activity

Developing strong relationships with regulatory authorities was an area receiving priority at present. “We already have intelligence agreements in place with the Scottish and Irish authorities. Very soon we will have similar with the Food Standards Agency and the National Food Crime Unit.”

The network could also support its members and the wider food industry by conducting research and honing technology to support testing programmes, said Sisson.

The Greencore boss chaired the afternoon session of New Food’s Food Fraud conference in London on March 1. The morning session was chaired by Professor Elliott, Pro-Vice Chancellor of Queen’s University, Belfast.

Meanwhile, don’t miss New Food’s video interview with Professor Elliott about why he believed the food industry does not take food fraud seriously enough.

Missed Food Fraud 2018? You can purchase the conference pack here.

VIDEO: Food fraud penalties ‘absolutely not sufficient’, says Prof Chris Elliott

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