article

The perks of buying local

A general consensus agrees that food less than 400 miles from its origin, or within state boundaries, qualifies as locally grown. Allison Stowell, Megan Majeski and Kitty Broihier, explain why buying local produce is good for you, the environment and the economy.

Local

BUY LOCAL: Seasonal eating allows us to build meals around freshly harvested foods at their peak and adapt our diet to welcome the varying crops of the season.

The idea of eating locally-sourced foods is not exactly new, after all, local agriculture was once the only way to eat. Today, however, the increasing presence of local options in supermarkets is relatively new. Because there is no predetermined distance to define what consumers consider ‘local’, the US Department of Agriculture defines local food as, “the direct or intermediated marketing of food to consumers that is produced and distributed in a limited geographic area.” A general consensus agrees that food less than 400 miles from its origin, or within state boundaries, qualifies as locally grown. 

Seasonal eating allows us to build meals around freshly harvested foods at their peak and adapt our diet to welcome the varying crops of the season. Eating seasonally puts us in touch with the natural rhythms of the land around us and allows us to appreciate the unique bounty each season has to offer. Additionally, farmers growing food for local consumption have the luxury of being able to choose varieties of produce based on taste and nutrition, versus yield or ability to endure transport. That also means heirloom varieties of your favourites are more likely to be available locally.

The rest of this article is restricted to logged-in members. Login or subscribe free to read it.


Send this to a friend