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Steaming ahead

Posted: 31 January 2005 | Ellen Moens-Go Yanko, Office Manager, Secretariat, EHEDG | No comments yet

Worldwide membership of EHEDG stands at 50 corporate members and 380 individuals representing 350 companies/institutions in the field of manufacturing (equipment and food), supplier/ consulting services, research and education.

Priorities in 2005 are to involve more local food manufacturers both as hygienic engineering concept practitioners and developers; to grow and extend the regional branches; to invest in a restructure of the working parties; to streamline guideline production and to adopt a sustainable training strategy to efficiently transfer knowledge from current work and published criteria to the end-users.

Worldwide membership of EHEDG stands at 50 corporate members and 380 individuals representing 350 companies/institutions in the field of manufacturing (equipment and food), supplier/ consulting services, research and education. Priorities in 2005 are to involve more local food manufacturers both as hygienic engineering concept practitioners and developers; to grow and extend the regional branches; to invest in a restructure of the working parties; to streamline guideline production and to adopt a sustainable training strategy to efficiently transfer knowledge from current work and published criteria to the end-users.

Worldwide membership of EHEDG stands at 50 corporate members and 380 individuals representing 350 companies/institutions in the field of manufacturing (equipment and food), supplier/ consulting services, research and education.

Priorities in 2005 are to involve more local food manufacturers both as hygienic engineering concept practitioners and developers; to grow and extend the regional branches; to invest in a restructure of the working parties; to streamline guideline production and to adopt a sustainable training strategy to efficiently transfer knowledge from current work and published criteria to the end-users.

For publication this year:

‘Hygienic engineering of fluid bed and spray dryer plants’

Because these plants handle moist products in an airborne state, they are susceptible to hygiene risks, including a possible transfer of allergens between products. It is therefore critical to apply hygienic design considerations to both the process and machinery in order to prevent occurrence of such risks. The Dry materials handling subgroup addresses these issues in detail in their latest document. Starting with the basics with regard to the design, construction materials, layout and zone classification of the drying systems to meet hygienic requirements, the subgroup then outlines component design aspects of the processing chamber – with particular attention to the atomisation assembly and the distribution grids for fluidisation. Systems for both supply and exhaust air should operate in a hygienic manner and the document lists recommendations for the use and installation of various types of filters. Finally, operational aspects, including sampling, control and general housekeeping are briefly discussed.

Other titles produced by this subgroup are: ‘General hygienic design criteria for the safe processing of dry particulate materials’ (2001) and ‘Hygienic engineering of plants for the processing of dry particulate materials’ (2003). Work is ongoing on discharging systems for dry particulate materials.

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