• Facebook
  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn
  • Google+
  • RSS

Titration - Articles and news items

Titration techniques in the food industry

Issue 2 2007, Past issues  •  23 May 2007  •  NF

Titration is an analytical technique that is widely used in the food industry. It allows food manufacturers to determine the quantity of a reactant in a sample. For example, it can be used to discover the amount of salt or sugar in a product or the concentration of vitamin C or E, which has an effect on product colour.

Solubility of carbon dioxide in meat

Issue 4 2006, Past issues  •  6 November 2006  •  Marianne Jakobsen, Department of Food Science, Food Chemistry, The Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Denmark

Marianne Jakobsen, Department of Food Science, Food Chemistry, The Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Denmark

Modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) is widely used for the packaging of meat. In MAP, carbon dioxide (CO2) is primarily used due to its ability to inhibit the growth of a wide range of microorganisms (Farber 1991) and thereby extend the storage life of fresh meat. When high CO2 levels are applied, the concentration of CO2 in package headspace will decline during the first days of storage due to absorption of CO2 in the meat. CO2 dissolves in both muscle and fat tissue (Gill 1988), until saturation or equilibrium is reached.

Protein-polyphenol interactions

Issue 3 2006, Past issues  •  11 August 2006  •  Richard Frazier, Lecturer, School of Food Biosciences, University of Reading and Rebecca Green, Lecturer, School of Pharmacy, University of Reading

Evidence has been reported that dietary consumption of plants and plant products that are rich in tannins, such as cocoa, wine, tea and berries, can be related to protective effects against cardiovascular disease and certain forms of cancer.

These protective effects are assumed to stem from the antioxidant activity of tannins and their ability to act as free radical scavengers; free radicals being known to have damaging effects on cells and DNA in vivo. Polyphenols also possess a significant binding affinity for proteins, which can lead to the formation of soluble and/or insoluble complexes.

 

Webinar: Allergen testing and risk management within food manufacturingWATCH NOW
+ +