Refrigeration and freezing - Articles and news items

Camouflage apples: an exciting new quality assurance spy

Industry news  •  23 March 2017  •  Empa

A sensor developed at Empa solves this problem. It looks like a piece of fruit and acts like a piece of fruit – but is actually a spy.

Feeding Asia: How improving cold chain efficiency could alleviate India’s malnutrition

Blogs, Feeding Asia, Z Homepage Promo  •  19 January 2017  •  David Appel; Jon Shaw, Carrier Transicold & Refrigeration Systems

In the latest in our ‘Feeding Asia’ series, we look at how an improved efficiency in the cold chain might help reduce Indian food waste and fight against malnutrition…

Frozen product popularity not simply a case of convenience

Industry news  •  9 January 2017  •  Elsevier

Although time saving is a factor, parents report more complex reasons for buying prepackaged, processed meals, according to a new study…

ConAgra Foods separation another step closer

Industry news  •  14 July 2016  •  Victoria White, Digital Content Producer

ConAgra Foods, has filed a Form 10 Registration Statement related to its planned separation into two independent public companies…

Avoid losses in food quality by observing the cool chain

Featured news  •  9 June 2016  •  PCE Instruments

The concept of an uninterrupted cold chain in the food industry consists of two main pillars which are transport and storage…

Success story: Apetit Plc, Finland

Featured news  •  18 May 2016  •  TOMRA Sorting Food

Apetit Plc is a Finnish producer of convenient fresh and frozen vegetable based products…

Refrigeration: A deep dive into the deep freeze

Issue 2 2016  •  26 April 2016  •  Ruud van der Sman, Food & Biobased Research, Wageningen University & Research Centre (UR)

Freezing is an important means for food preservation as, with this technology, long term storage of high quality foods is possible. To achieve high food quality the freezing rate is an important parameter, determining ice crystal size and shape and also the mechanical stresses imparted to the food. For foods with a cellular structure the ice crystal size, with respect to the cell size, is a critical measure, determining the texture and water holding capability of the food after thawing. If ice crystals grow too large during freezing, they will puncture the cell membrane and the food will leak the intracellular fluid during thawing. Also, the food texture will become unappetising and mushy…

New Food’s top 10 stories from 2015

Blogs  •  28 January 2016  •  Stephanie Anthony, Editor, New Food

New Food magazine have put together our highlights of 2015, based on what our readers have been looking at most…

The sky’s the limit for frozen foods

Industry news  •  21 October 2015  •  Victoria White

Suppliers of frozen foods are being encouraged to consider expanding their business horizons, following research which suggests there is a gap in the airline market for their products…

Temperature control strategies for smarter energy use in refrigerated warehouses

Issue 4 2015  •  1 September 2015  •  Kostadin Fikiin, Refrigeration Science and Technology, Technical University of Sofia (Bulgaria), Chairman of the EHEDG Working Group ‘Food Refrigeration Equipment’

Temperature is generally considered as the single most important factor for determining food quality and safety. This definition means that a lot of other process parameters or storage conditions may more or less influence upon the food product in different industrial situations, but temperature is the main physical value as its impact is always enormous. Hence, we will never be wrong to say that “proper temperature control, temperature control and again temperature control” is the prime simple receipt for the success of every food processor, store operator or retailer. The temperature-controlled cold supply chain for refrigerated processing, storage, distribution, retail and household handling of foods is therefore of paramount importance for guaranteeing safety, quality, wholesomeness and extended shelf-life of perishable commodities…

Superchilling can safely extend shelf life by 120%

Featured news  •  19 August 2015  •  Victoria White

Research carried out by Campden BRI has shown that superchilling can safely extend the shelf life of chilled foods without any loss of sensory quality…

Industry experts feature at the highly anticipated Refrigerated Food Safety Forum 2015

Featured news  •  15 June 2015  •  Smithers Pira

Full program announced for the Refrigerated Food Safety Forum, taking place from30th September – 1st October 2015, London, UK…

Refrigeration: Can magnetism improve the storage of foods?

Issue 2 2015  •  23 April 2015  •  Christian James, Graham Purnell & Stephen J James, Food Refrigeration and Process Engineering Research Centre, Grimsby Institute of Further and Higher Education

Frozen food is one of the largest sectors of the food industry and its value is increasing throughout the world. According to market research by Food For Thought, the frozen food market in seven of the major Western European economies was valued at €83.51 billion in 2013 and is expected to grow in value by approximately 11% by 2016.

Freeze-drying in the coffee industry

Issue 2 2015  •  23 April 2015  •  Davide Fissore, Department of Applied Science and Technology, Politecnico di Torino

Freeze-drying is a process used in food processing to remove water from foodstuffs, with the goal of increasing their shelf life. The process consists of various steps: At first product temperature is lowered, usually to about -40°C, thus causing freezing of the free water. Later, the pressure in the equipment is lowered and sublimation of the frozen water occurs (primary drying). Finally, the bound water is removed from the product, usually increasing product temperature and further decreasing the pressure in the equipment, thus reaching the target value of residual moisture (secondary drying)…

Current advances in food freezing

Issue 5 2014  •  27 October 2014  •  Christian James and Stephen J. James, Food Refrigeration and Process Engineering Research Centre, Grimsby Institute of Further and Higher Education

Frozen food is one of the largest sectors of the food industry and its value is increasing throughout the world. The frozen food market in seven of the major Western European Economies was valued at €83.51 billion in 2013 and is expected to grow in value by 10.89 per cent by 2016. The market is broadly segmented into frozen; vegetables and fruits, potatoes, ready meals, meat, fish/seafood and soup and more than 35 per cent of this market is in the frozen ready meals sector. In a previous article for New Food we discussed different innovative freezing technologies for foods. Apart from impingement, many of the technologies discussed are still in development. In this article we will look at proven technologies…